‘Up on the Mountain & Down by the River’ | Felicity Bristow & Susie Leiper

‘Up on the Mountain & Down by the River’ | Felicity Bristow & Susie Leiper

30 June 2018 – 20 July 2018 Upright Gallery, Edinburgh ‘Susie loves being up on the mountain. Felicity enjoys walking down by the river. Both artists share a fascination with absorbent papers, which react randomly to the inks applied to them, echoing the uncontrollable changing faces of the land and the water. Felicity’s inks are drawn upwards, splitting into a blaze of brilliant hues, while for Susie, varying dilutions of Chinese inks struggle against resists and create extraordinary, unrepeatable marks. As well as making wall works, both Felicity and Susie are fascinated by the book form and distil some of their work in this format.’ Ian Farmer, Owner & Curator...
‘textus ventilus’ | #Residency at Earthed by W M Clark, Upperlands

‘textus ventilus’ | #Residency at Earthed by W M Clark, Upperlands

During this exciting research and development commission awarded by Gayfield Projects to create a protoype linen product for their materials led #linen exhibition ‘Our Linen Stories’, I have been exploring how my ‘ephemeral’ work using chromatography can be transferred onto a linen textile, exploring the traditions and contemporary methods of transferring pattern design onto fabric from my studio process based on random and atmospheric alterations of #movingcolour. The separations of pigment and solutions I make from distilled natural dye and manufactured inks and pigments develop their own ‘pattern’ on my papers dependent on where they are set up and what the weather and ambient temperature is – the colder it is the slower and more effective the process. It is a constant delight how such subtle changes in environment can create unique and beautiful outcomes in my continuous series of site specific ‘Draw-ing(s)’. By exchanging my narrative collecting medium of paper, for linen cloth, a whole new set of design questions has been evolving and required testing. How do I move colour on or in a textile? I know and understand that the irregular but closely packed cellulose fibre structure of my paper allows for very small separations of pigment to occur. When working in the same way with linen and linen unions (a mixture of flax linen and cotton, it has a cotton warp and linen weft) the structure of weave and weft partially blocks this vertical movement which is why moving to work in digital print onto textile makes a lot of sense in transferring my original art works to textile and developing digital colour separations. Detail...
‘textus ventilus’ | An introduction to #mylinenstory

‘textus ventilus’ | An introduction to #mylinenstory

I live and work in the Scottish Borders with my husband and young family who are enjoying growing up surrounded by a rich and diverse farmed and natural countryside. We can walk to the banks of the River Tweed within 10 minutes and enjoy its varied ‘states’ of watery ferocity – it is a strong river, and its colour often rich and foreboding. This body of water has become my creative muse as I walk its banks, ‘editing’ the natural world through photography and noting what is in season, what is thriving (or not) and what has changed month to month. My discoveries reveal the subtle and concealed complexities of the rich Eco-system we live alongside. Sketch Detail from ‘The Banks of a River’ | Maxton, Scottish Borders The view from our house is of the beautiful Eildon Hills; the changing weather patterns moving over these hills is a continuous inspiration to me with subtle colour changes and gradations of cloud and the dramatic erosion of the view as the fog or rain rolls over the landscape (or driving snow as in recent extreme weather!). I have never seen so many rainbows appear in one location, they are almost daily some weeks! I consider that this repetitive visual prompt has seeped into my work as I reflect on the view. The separations of pigment and solutions I use in my process develop their own patterns on my papers dependent on where they are set up and what the weather and ambient temperature is. It is a constant delight how such subtle changes in environment can create unique and beautiful...
Awarded the 2018 Gayfield Projects R + D Commission | #textusventilus

Awarded the 2018 Gayfield Projects R + D Commission | #textusventilus

I am delighted to announce that I have accepted this new research and development award offering a unique £10k supported opportunity to take the time to research and work with manufacturers and textile specialists to develop a prototype product in this years nominated material – the beautiful textile the romans called textus ventilus or as translated, ‘woven wind’. I am very excited to shortly be heading across to Northern Ireland to spend time with Duncan Neil the Creative Director of the innovative contemporary printed irish linen company Earthed by WM Clark, based in the village of Upperlands, who has specific expertise in pioneering digital print techniques on linen. I look forward to sharing my process and research in the upcoming exhibition and events series Saturday 5 May – 26 May 2018 – ‘Our Linen Stories‘. The commission also offers the supported opportunity for a further period of research and development to visit the Textiel Museum in Tilburg, The Netherlands, which is home to one of Europe’s most innovative Textile Labs. It operates as an open resource for those interested in developing their skills and forwarding good practice. A huge thank you to Dr John Ennis of Gayfield Projects, curator of the Material World Series of exhibitions and events from GP Journeys in Design. I am looking forward to sharing #ourlinenstories along the way. Please follow my commission via @textusventilus on instagram for updates about my ‘material journey’ #ourlinenstories #linen #wovenwind...
Artist Book Exhibition | bound : unbound | 20 January – 28 February 2018

Artist Book Exhibition | bound : unbound | 20 January – 28 February 2018

20 January – 28 February 2018 &Gallery, Edinburgh Please view online catalogue. ‘The members of bound : unbound come from a variety of disciplines: Felicity Bristow and Lynda Wilson share backgrounds in architecture, Liza Green is a textile artist, Susie Wilson’s engagement is with printmaking and Susie Leiper’s with calligraphy and painting. All five artists come together through the medium of the book. In a group exhibition their works sing with variety and astound in the scope of their creativity.’ Avril Nicol | January...
Mapping the Borders | ‘Being Human Festival’, Jedburgh – 19th November 2017

Mapping the Borders | ‘Being Human Festival’, Jedburgh – 19th November 2017

Venue              The Bakery Studio, Rear of 11A Exchange Street, Jedburgh Date                Sunday November 19th Time                Sunrise (7.53am) – Sunset (15.57pm) Note: The artists will work from 7.00am – 17.00pm to complete a ten hour performance duration. Hutton’s Unconformity, a site of international geological interest located just outside of Jedburgh is a location where rock formations make different timescales visible.   ‘We are not to look for nature in a quiescent state; matter itself must be in motion, and the scenes of life a continued or repeated series of agitations and events’ James Hutton, Theory of the Earth 1788   Entr’actes: Alternative Arrangements is the first in a series of collaborative explorations by the artists Felicity Bristow and Claire Pençak working with the vast scale and processes of geological or ‘deep’ time. The durational studio performance is a response through movement, architecture and materials to Hutton’s Unconformity at Inchbonny, Jedburgh. The artists will be working between dawn to dusk through a series of action scores and material interventions exploring accumulation and dis-accumulation, erosion and deposition, change of state, reset and rearrangement and the near, far and infinite. Audiences are invited to enter the performance at any time and stay for as long as they wish as it evolves. Please come warmly dressed, as the Bakery Studio is not centrally heated. Hot drinks will be available all day.   ‘The result, therefore of our present enquiry is, that we find no vestige of a beginning – no prospect of an end’ James Hutton, Theory of the Earth, 1788   We are sorry but this venue is not fully...